Viral Hepatitis

Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D (the delta agent). The hepatitis D virus was discovered in Italy by Mario Rizzetto in 1977 during an investigation of the distribution of the Hepatitis B virus antigens in liver biopsy specimens of patients chronically infected…

Hepatitis C

Epidemiology Hepatitis C virus, identified in 1988, is an RNA virus that appears to be responsible for most instances of parenterally transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis. The virus seems to mutate frequently and appear in many subtypes. Table 49-6…

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Transmission of hepatitis B in the United States occurs predominantly through contact with infected blood products or body secretions (saliva, vaginal fluids, and semen) or…

Viral Hepatitis

Hepatitis A Medications (Drugs, Medicines) Drug(s) of Choice Antiviral therapy not indicated in acute HAV infections as spontaneous resolution occurs in almost all patients Contraindications: Corticosteroids may add to morbidity/increased mortality. Precautions: N/A Significant possible interactions: Refer to…

Hepatitis, Viral

Definition Viral hepatitis refers to the clinically important hepatotrophic viruses responsible for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, delta hepatitis, hepatitis C, and hepatitis E. Viral hepatitis has acute, fulminant, and chronic clinical forms defined by duration or severity of…

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A infection is one of the most frequently reported vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States. The incidence of hepatitis A correlates directly with poor sanitary conditions and hygienic practices. Hepatitis A infection occurs primarily from person-to-person transmission….