Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Treatment of IBS. Dietary Fiber and Bulking Agents

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is both a physiologic and psychological syndrome. Thus, pharmacological treatment may be geared towards alleviating gastrointestinal symptoms; concurrently, medications may be prescribed to temper the pain component of IBS or modify underlying affective disorders…

Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Clinical presentation Symptoms Patients with irritable bowel syndrome typically complain of crampy abdominal pain and constipation. In some patients, chronic constipation is punctuated by brief episodes of diarrhea. A minority of patients have only diarrhea. Symptoms usually have…

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Management. Initial Therapy

Management The American Digestive Health Foundation recommends that the most cost-effective and beneficial treatment for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is probably establishment of an effective clinical relationship. They suggest a series of steps, including 1) acknowledgment…

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Antidiarrheal Agents

Loperamide, an opioid agonist, is commonly used for patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The drug increases gastrointestinal (GI) transit time, enhances water and ion absorption, and increases rectal sphincter tone. It is preferred over other opioid…

Irritable bowel syndrome

Description of Medical Condition Altered bowel habits, abdominal pain, gaseousness, in the absence of organic pathology (divided into four types): • Alternating diarrhea with constipation • Diarrhea predominant • Constipation predominant • Upper abdominal bloating and discomfort System(s)…

Treatment of IBS. Antispasmodic Agents

Antimuscarinic agents such as hyoscyamine and dicyclomine, a nonspecific smooth muscle relaxant with antimuscarinic activity, have been used to treat symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Controlled studies assessing the efficacy of these medications are lacking. One…

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Pathophysiology

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was historically described using the terminology spastic colon, nervous stomach, and colitis, among others. These descriptions are no longer considered accurate or acceptable. IBS is currently defined as lower abdominal pain, disturbed defecation, and…

Cholecystokinin A Receptor Antagonists

Overview Cholecystokinin (CCK), a neurohormonal peptide found in both the central and enteric nervous systems, is involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion. Development activity with regard to antagonists at CCK receptors is limited. The only…

Tachykinin Receptor Antagonists

Overview The role of the neurokinins (tachykinins) — substance P, neurokinin A, and neurokinin B — in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome has been the subject of considerable investigation and debate within the scientific community. Many companies…

IBS: Pathophysiology

The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is heterogeneous, involving motor, central nervous system (CNS) and autonomic abnormalities, enhanced visceral sensitivity, and complex psychosocial factors. Patients with IBS may have alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) tract motility in response…